URESPA Club Visits Indigenous Taiwanese

September 1, 2016

(Japanese translation below)

 

Most people are familiar with Native American Indians, the Maori of New Zealand, the Aborigines of Australia and Ainu of Japan. But did you know that there are also indigenous people in the small island country of Taiwan? In fact, there are twenty-seven distinctly different aboriginal tribes in Taiwan.

  

From February 26 to March 3 of this year the SU URESPA Club visited Taiwan to learn about the native peoples of Taiwan and what kind of policy the Taiwanese government has in dealing with them. Thirteen students and four teachers took the trip.

  

Even though there are twenty-seven distinctly different aboriginal tribes, the Taiwanese government only recognizes 16 of them officially. Some of the tribes were assimilated in the 17th and 18th centuries when people from the Chinese mainland Han culture started living in Taiwan.

  

Our first day was flying from Shin-Chitose airport to Haneda airport, then on to Taipei airport and finally arriving at Taitou airport. From Taitou airport we went to a Bunun village where Bunun aboriginal people live and own a tourist facility. We arrived at night and we ate original Bunun food and slept. The next morning we watched a traditional Bunun dance. After that we went to the National Taiwan History Museum.

  

We learned about the history of the 16 officially recognized indigenous tribes. In one corner of the museum there were 16 tablets that teach you the 16 different tribal languages. It was very interesting and educational. After the museum, we went back to the village and had a tour around the village and learned how they made the tourist facility. That night we performed some of our traditional dances for each other.

  

On the morning of the third day, we participated a Bunun worship ceremony, and then we went to the Taiwan Indigenous Peoples’ Culture Park. The park was so big that we had to ride a bus that take us around the park. We saw many different traditional dances and traditional houses.

 

That night we stayed in a Rinari village. We each stayed at different houses like a homestay. It was very hard to communicate because no one spoke Japanese or English, so we had to use jesters.

  

On the fourth day, we went to Formosan Aboriginal Culture Village where we watched a show and visited a museum. The museum had many valuable historical items. We also talked to many elderly Indigenous people. It was very moving to hear their living history.

  

On the 5th day, we went to the Taiwan Indigenous Peoples’ TV Station. It’s a TV station for indigenous people and people who want to learn about their culture. The TV shows use indigenous languages. Eighty percent of Taiwanese who are not indigenous say they like this channel because it is the only channel where they can learn about indigenous people.

  

Next we went to the Public Power Vision. At this station there were news experts from each tribe. Also, there are about 780 indigenous people living in the village and they have coverage for each tribe.

  

After that, we went to the Council of Indigenous Peoples. We went there to learn what kind of policy the government has toward indigenous people and what other things they are doing for them.

  

On the last day, we went to a Presbyterian Church in Taiwan. The Presbyterian Church has been helping the indigenous people for many years. They do things like make books for them to learn their own language and culture and help them to recover their rights. There are 514 churches for indigenous people. Almost all of them are Christian.

  

In the afternoon, we went to Shih Hsin University to meet with the indigenous students enrolled there. We had a discussion about the rights of indigenous people and about how to recover culture, as well as many other topics.

  

On this Journey to Taiwan we learned many things. One surprising thing was how the policy for indigenous people in Taiwan is more forwarded-looking than in Japan. One reason it is more forwarded-looking is because the people there have demanded it. We learned that we shouldn’t always depend on the government. If you want something to be done, you have to start a movement on your own.

 

 

台湾研修(札幌大学ウレシパクラブ)

米澤 諒

 

多くの方は、アメリカの先住民族、ニュージーランドの先住民族のマオリ、オーストラリアの先住民族のアボリジニーや日本のアイヌのことを知っています。しかし、台湾という小さい島の先住民族について知っていますか?しかも、そこには27も違い先住民族がいます。

 

今年の2月26日から3月3日まで札幌大学ウレシパクラブの学生13人と先生4人は台湾研修を行いました。台湾の先住民族と台湾政府などが先住民に対して行なっている政策などを学ぶためです。台湾には27も違う先住民族がいますが、政府に認められているのが16民族のみです。17から18世紀に中国本土から来た漢民族との同化により自分たちの文化を無くした民族もいます。

 

1日目は、新千歳空港〜羽田空港〜台北〜台東〜ブムン村へと移動して終わりました。2日目の朝はブヌン民族の伝統的な踊りを見ました。そのあとに台湾史歴史博物館に行きました。そこでは、政府に認められている16民族の歴史などを学びました。また、一箇所のコーナーでは16個のタブレットがあり、それを使って16民族それぞれの言語を学ぶことができます。とても面白く勉強になります。博物館のあとはブヌン村に戻り、村の中を案内してもらいながらどうやって観光施設にしたのかを学びました。夜にはアイヌの伝統舞踊を披露しました。

  

3日目の朝は、ブヌン村に教会に行き、礼拝に参加させていただきました。そのあとは、台湾現住民族文化公園に行きました。そこでは、いろんな先住民族の伝統的な踊りや家屋を見ました。そのあとは、リナリ村に行きました。リナリ村では2人ずつが一つの家にホームスティーみたいな感じで泊まりました。日本語と英語をしゃべる人が居なかったので交流するのが大変でしたがジェスチャで交流しました。

  

4日目は、9族文化村に行き、伝統舞踊を見て博物館をめぐりました。博物館にはかなりの重要歴史的なアイテムがありました。また、多くの年寄りの先住民族の方とお話をすることができました。彼らの人生について聞くことができて、とても感動しました。

 

5日目は、台湾先住民族テレビ局を訪れました。このテレビ局は、先住民族と先住民族の文化を学びたい人のための局です。放送中は先住民族の言語が使われています。80%の先住民族ではない人がアンケートで、この局に満足していると答えています。理由は、先住民族について学べる唯一の曲だからと言っていました。次は、公共テレビ局を訪れました。そこには、各民族専用の記者がいます。台湾に先住民族の村が約780あり、記者たちはすべてを周っています。そのあとは、台湾先住民族協議会に行きました。政府がどのよう政策を取っているのか、これからどのようにしたいのかを学ぶために訪れました。

  

最終日は、台湾基督長老教会を訪れました。協会は、長年も先住民族を助けてきた歴史があります。例えば、言語が復興するために教科書を作ったり、先住民の権利を取るための運動を手伝ったりしています。先住民のための教会が514教会もあります。多くの先住民は現在キリスト教です。午後には世新大学の先住民の学生と交流するために訪れました。お互いに踊りの披露やディスカッションを行いました。ディスカッションの内容は、先住民の権利についてや文化復興をするにはなどなどです。

  

今回の研修で多くのことを学ぶことができました。一番驚いたことは、台湾では先住民族のための政策が日本よりとても進んでいることです。一つの理由は、台湾の先住民族が強く要求するため現実することができた。また、政府には頼ってはならない。欲しいものや行って欲しいことがあれば、自分でやるべきであると学びました。

Share on Facebook
Please reload